All Your Questions Answered About The High Value Job Feature

   

Dear Freelancers,

We have recently rolled out a new feature – High Value Jobs – that has attracted quite a bit of attention from your side. We would like to address the questions and concerns voiced by the community, and explain what benefits this feature brings to the table.

The Definition of High Value Job

For a Job to be deemed High Value, it has to tick multiple requirement boxes. High Value Job does not necessarily mean it has a large initial budget or that the first invoice is guaranteed to be high. Our predictive algorithm factors in various criteria, such as:

  • The likelihood of follow-on work, based on historical data.
  • The Job’s budget
  • Relevant historical data that allows us to make accurate predictions.

You are right in raising concerns that some of the jobs marked as High Value don’t seem to be particularly promising at the first sight. In light of that, we want to stress the fact that High Value Jobs are predicted to yield more value for the Seller either with the first invoice or over a longer period of time. You must consider both possibilities when bidding on a High Value Job.

Why do High Value Jobs cost more proposal credits?

It costs 3 proposal credits to bid on a High Value Job. Although it might feel like a big jump compared to regular Jobs, it’s crucial to take into consideration the high earning potential in the long term. Think of High Value Jobs as a way to get your foot in the door and potentially win more projects from the same Buyer in the future. It must be said, however, that High Value Jobs are based on the evaluations of a predictive algorithm, and all predictions run a possible risk of being flawed. Though having tested and trained the algorithm, we are positive it is more than capable of accurately attributing a Job as High Value when all the criteria are met, and we will continue to refine it in the future.

This new feature is a quick and simple way for you to spot and consider opportunities with significant earning potential. Whether you want to take your chance and place a bid or move on to something else, the decision is entirely up to you. Yet, as it is in life, great opportunities come at a cost.    

Over to You

Every feature we release is designed to enhance your experience of using the platform and help you increase your earnings. We understand that, being entrepreneurs, you will always demand better quality, higher standards, and lower costs, and that’s what’s been driving us forward for the past 10 years.

Your opinion is important and valued, so we ask you to leave any feedback, thoughts, ideas, and suggestions you might have in the comments section below and we will respond to you promptly.

10 Comments

  • adam

    Why have you stopped selling 100 credits bundle packs? I would be more inclined to bid on them but 3 is a lot when you don’t have larger value packs

  • Scott Andrew

    To be honest, I think before introducing things like this, there really ought to be a thing of credits getting refunded for the sheer amount of jobs that get posted and then the person never picks someone to work with. That’s going to be 5 high value jobs a month people can apply to.

    Will there be a system in place where by the 3 credits get refunded if the person doesn’t pick someone to work with? Accepting this happening with normal jobs is irritating enough. When it comes to 3 credits, it’s going to be a bigger hit…. If not, when can freelancers here get a little love as it just seems to be increases and increases. First it was the increasing of the fees to 20% and now it feels like a method to just get people buying more credits, as nothing else really changes.

  • Anay Mittal

    Exactly! Most of the jobs that we submit our proposals for are let expire by the buyers, due to any reason. These proposals too should be treated as cancelled once they expire and the credit points used for such jobs be refunded.
    By the way, you mentioned probability of long time work as one of the parameters of the High Value jobs. How do you judge this parameter for a job –

    1) where the buyer has never worked with PPH before?
    Ref. example- http://prntscr.com/gycnrx

    2) where the budget is way less than so said threshold of £220?
    Ref. example # http://prntscr.com/gycovi It appears the threshold was compromised in this instance as the budget is £150.

    This is just one example of each of the 2 parameters mentioned (nos. 1 and 3 points are similar.) I too feel this is just way making freelancers loose more bid points, in shorter period, and then having to buy more. A ‘smart’ move.

    I don’t feel this practice is adding any practical ‘value’ but only to the ways for a ‘business’ to earn more. Can’t say that is a wrong or unexpected practice but still, it is unfair.

    Yes, first the increase in the pph fee, then the ‘effective’ of working (correct working, that is) of the moderation team and now more than 1 bid point for the jobs. These things are worrisome.

  • Ahmed

    I think its very high for me to use 3 credit.

    PPH already only provide 15 bids in month.

    And two weeks ago PPH remove the option of 100 bids from menu.

    So I think its unfair from every side with seller.

  • Sandrine Bascouert

    I do not have anything against or for the idea. I can see the rationale behind it, particularly the higher amount of 3 credits to start with. Anything that can get the “bots” or boilerplate proposal to land on a client side disappear is good, even if it cost us more (I am always selective anyway)

    One thing that would be beneficial in the context of being “high value” IMHO, is to select only well written, comprehensive, with samples, in short a well detailed brief requests for proposals to be included in the scheme. Because you are never going to convince me you’re high value, if your request is a one liner – algorithm or not – you are never going to look professional if you can’t even describe what you want.

    That’s OK for low amounts jobs (not necessarily low value, I often bid on quick/simple jobs as long as they meet my £ criteria), you can make a tentative bid to know more, knowing that it won’t be addressed 90% of the time… But not if it costs you sensibly more to bid…

  • Adrian

    ‘The likelihood of follow-on work’ – but if you did the first job cheap does your algorithm somehow predict that follow on jobs will be paid at a higher/fairer rate? This is just nonsense.

  • Leanne

    It would be easier to take the 3 credit hit if the 100 bids package came back. Not really worth the risk on the lower packages 🙁

  • Jack Sparrow

    This all sounds very reasonable.

    Until you pick at the seams and it all unwravels like a badly knit sweater.

    You state that it must tick ‘has to tick multiple requirement boxes’. Yet the main factors in your ‘predictive algorithm’ simply don’t add up when comparing the jobs which are specified as ‘High Value’.

    ‘The likelihood of follow-on work, based on historical data.’- This doesn’t take into account that follow-on-work can be performed on or off PPH. The initial job is restricted to PPH understandably, anything else is irrelevent to PPH.

    The majority of follow-on-work – which is a rarity – is performed directly between client and developer outside of PPH – at least in my experience, using 3rd party escrow services where needed. I’m sure many others are the same.

    ‘The Job’s budget’. This is fanciful. I’ve seen High Value jobs as low as £150, so no baseline, but jobs at £1.5k+ not set as High Value. So other criteria ‘must’ be at play. Yet when looking at job requirements, and %awarded, they simply don’t match – low %awarded and insufficient requirements.

    It seems increasingly apparent that no one – with any relevent experience to the job niche – checks to see if the job specification is up to standard, or that it even close to matches the allocated budget.

    “This new feature is a quick and simple way for you to spot and consider opportunities with significant earning potential”. – No it’s not. As an experienced web developer I know what constitutes a suitable job – budget, spec & requirements, and buyer experience. I’ve yet to see more than a handful of jobs which come even close to being a premium opportunity.

    ‘Jobs are predicted to yield more value for the Seller either with the first invoice or over a longer period of time.’ – Sorry, but that is meaningless pseude-jibberish. Does a first invoice guarantee timely payment on the full job? and what exactly is a ‘longer period of time’?

    Some random examples:

    https://www.peopleperhour.com/job/looking-for-experienced-wordpress-developer-1760665 – 1st job, 0% awarded… low budget

    https://www.peopleperhour.com/job/digital-delivery-shopping-cart-website-1760450 – May be 60% awarded, but it’s a full ecommerce site plus 1yr support for $250!!! One of the worse cases I’ve seen so far.

    https://www.peopleperhour.com/job/website-one-page-design-1761213 – Yet again, an abysmal budget indicating NO baseline, even the historical jobs awarded is low at 27%!

    https://www.peopleperhour.com/job/professional-website-design-logo-business-card-design-1761081 – The title and job requirements don’t match, and when analysing the job requirements – which arent sufficient at all the budget is wholly inappropriate.

    https://www.peopleperhour.com/job/looking-for-a-professional-e-commerce-website-for-a-online-s-1760956 – Getting closer, but the job requirements don’t specify any functonality other than an ecommerce shop. Not acceptable. And this is a 1st job / 0% award so can’t be used for historical comparison.

    https://www.peopleperhour.com/job/php-laravel-google-search-api-integration-a-backlink-man-1761765 – How is this high value? low % awarded, and anyone with ANY dev experience will see the budget is pitiful.

    https://www.peopleperhour.com/job/interactive-website-for-demolition-business-1763042 – 0% so this is budget based, but the requirements aren’t suitably specified.

    I could go ON, and ON, and ON. This is just a small set from one day. Every day is the same. Shameful.

    At a time when seller confidence is at an all time low – older PPH users being forcd onto less favourable commission structures, valid clarifications randomly moderated and rarely answered, ‘job contests’ – another name for on spec work, and of course the vast majority of jobs never awarded, all PPH is doing is adding more ‘features’ to fleece sellers.

    PPH has no statistics to back their claims up, and will no doubt not provide any. My own suggest this feature has more to do with their financial bottom line that ‘helping sellers.

    “Think of High Value Jobs as a way to get your foot in the door and potentially win more projects from the same Buyer in the future” – Let’s be frank here. The problem is that that vast amount of jobs are 1: never awarded, and 2: single instance jobs with no further action. Also see above for skewed stats on this issue.

    To the cynic in me this sounds very much like a scam to squeeze sellers even more by making them waste more proposals on fixed price jobs that have no more chance of being awarded than variable quote jobs.

    Nothing this blog article says suggests otherwise and dissuades me of that opinion. I’ve been keeping stats on this for a press article. They’re not pretty.

    I suggest all ‘High Value’ jobs that are blatantly not – i.e. 99% of them, are reported with the #ScrapHighValue hashtag, and use it when tweeting etc about PPH.

    “Though having tested and trained the algorithm, we are positive it is more than capable of accurately attributing a Job as High Value when all the criteria are met, and we will continue to refine it in the future.” – I suggest the whole concept is scrapped as a flawed attempt at increasing profits, and an apology made to the seller community.

    “Every feature we release is designed to enhance your experience of using the platform and help you increase your earnings. We understand that, being entrepreneurs, you will always demand better quality, higher standards, and lower costs, and that’s what’s been driving us forward for the past 10 years.” – Blatently not. If this was the case then there would have been far more work done – if any – on the quality of of experience for sellers. Spurious jobs with wholly unsuitable description / specifications, little or no barrier for entry for buyers, the abysmal no. of jobs awarded, broken clarification system…. That we can no longer see historical data from our dashboard speaks volumes.

    But that would mean far fewer jobs posted / validated, and less proposals used – if more refunded for example, affecting your financial bottom line.

    What you’ve got in the end is a platform with an ever decreasing no. of active freelancers – especially UK/EU based, with ever-more dereasingly dissatisfied buyers getting shotgun approaches from unqualified sellers – yes this is a complaint I’ve heard from buyers more than once. It’s an ever descreasing spiral.

    We’ll all be watching. Over to You.

  • Stephen Reeves

    Yet an other feature not thought about properly (include contests and sales leaderboard with this) and another feature aimed to take more money from us hard working sellers. With the fees you guys charge us you should start to really think about what we want and not what makes you money. If you keep adding features, fees, etc it will soon become extremely difficult for us to make profit.

  • Billy NoMates

    More and more examples of this shambolic ‘High Value’ farce on a daily basis.

    Low budget jobs, with no redeeming reatures such as high award rate.Many with job specs that are vague at best and unrealistic at worst.

    Yet, set as High Value, simply because they have a fixed £££ value. Seems apparent that there is a daily random quota of jobs set in this way.

    There’s no apparent logic, and no one with nich experience validates the job requirements against the budget.

    Algorithm my arse…

    Billy

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