The Advantages of Working with a Dyslexic Professional

   

If I had a pound for every person who has asked me if having dyslexia means I cannot read or write, then I would be a very rich woman!

I found out that I had severe dyslexia at the age of 23, which I was initially shocked about. This unexpected diagnosis made me realise that I needed to implement additional coping strategies into my working life, so that I could continue developing myself as a Marketing and PR professional.

Fast forward seven (cough cough) years (cough cough), I could not be happier with how much the dyslexia diagnosis has changed my life for the better. I am a lot more confident in myself, understand my strengths and weaknesses and continue to excel in all projects that I work on.

If you have concerns about hiring a dyslexic freelancer to complete a project on your behalf, then don’t be. Dyslexic professionals can offer you a wide range of invaluable skills, which will be a real asset to your project.

Fast Problem Solvers

Dyslexic people are usually considered as slow learners, but this is a myth, in fact one of the best assets that a dyslexic person possesses is an ability to solve problems by offering invaluable solutions in short time frames. As a dyslexic professional myself, I am always thinking of what can be detrimental with a project and what I can do in order to overcome those obstacles. This gives me the ability to be well-prepared for projects and ensures that I always deliver outstanding work for my clients.

I have spoken to numerous dyslexic entrepreneurs about their fast problem solving skills, with many of them stating that they follow a similar approach to myself, as this equips them with the skills to best support their clients if ever an obstacle arises.

Thinks Outside the Box

It is a well-known fact that those with dyslexia will suddenly have a surge of inspiration and can generate ideas and bespoke strategies in speedy timeframes and in an unconventional way. I myself have had some of my best ideas when driving, picking plants at the local garden centre or even when I am watching my favourite soap on the television. A dyslexic person will also think differently compared to a non-dyslexic person, for example, if you were presented with a picture of a tree, a dyslexic individual is more than likely to focus on the surroundings of the tree instead of the actual focal point of the image. This means you will receive a more in-depth analysis which looks at every possible angle to ensure the best for your business.   

 

Visual Thinkers

People with dyslexia tend to think things through via visuals instead of words. Numerous research states that people with dyslexia who think through visuals tend to have an enhanced picture recognition memory, demonstrating that dyslexics are usually highly gifted individuals who are more likely to produce well-detailed and superior work because of their well-thought through visual process.

client communication freelance job

Driven to Succeed

Dyslexic freelancers usually are highly motivated and ambitious professionals and will go to huge lengths to produce work which goes above the expectations of the client. They are also a very loyal bunch and take immense pride in the work they produce for you; I for one am one of these people, who gets a buzz from excelling on projects and loves nothing more than creating high quality work, which fulfils the client’s needs. I and many other dyslexic professionals are very enthusiastic and love nothing more than supporting businesses with achieving their goals.

By hiring a dyslexic freelancer, you will not just be getting someone to ‘do the job’, but you will get a well-rounded and proactive individual, who will look at your task from a different perspective and help you shed a new light on your project, business or personal needs.

Have you worked with a dyslexic professional before? If so, how did you find the experience and what did they achieve for you? Or are you the dyslexic individual? If so share with us what you find beneficial about being dyslexic. Comment below! 

About the Author:

Ellen is a Marketing, PR and Social Media professional with over seven years experience in the industry. She has worked with some of the UKs biggest brands and loves nothing more than working on content marketing projects, social media strategies, digital campaigns and more.

Take a look at her Hourlies here or click here to get in touch with her

 

 

 

 

 

9 Comments

  • Kate Walller

    Hi Ellen, thanks for sharing your story, I am also dyslexic, and found out when I was 19 at University, it was tough. But you make some very valid points in this article that it makes us driven, and certainly with my copywriting it makes me pay double the amount of attention to proof reading! It’s great to hear how well you’ve done as it affects us all differently. Congratulations on your success as an Entrepreneur and long may it continue!

  • roby hammond

    Hi Ellen

    Great article – and very well articulated

    I am a dyslexic – and I feel my dyslexia sets me apart – as per your broad views

    I am currently working as an entrepreneur wth in three projects:

    A gig economy marketplace
    A Kids content brand
    As a contemporary artist

    The world is different for us – it is good to discover like-minded people

    I am in my forties – and one thing i can add to your excellent article is that the strength that come from dyslexia only become more robust as you get older

    Best of luck

    Roby

  • Craig

    This post builds so many boxes around Dyslexia, i find it quite insulting to people who are Dyslexic. Comments like Dyslexic people are ‘very loyal’ makes it sound like your advertising golden retriever puppies. Can we please stop putting people into boxes, and treat each individual as what they are – ‘unique’ people, good points, faults and all.

  • Kelly

    Hi Craig,

    I’m sorry you feel this way. It was written by a fantastic lady who is a PPH seller. She has Dyslexia and wanted to discuss this. The comments you have mentioned have been written by her.

  • Gem A

    Really great article.

    I’m a dyslexic writer, this frightens the life out of people I work for! But I make little errors because I’ve taught myself how to edit and proof read my own work, which means I do work harder than others but I pride myself in my good grammar etc.

    I recently discovered that 40% of my team are dyslexic too. We’re all different obviously, but we are definitely more creative thinkers and problem solvers.

    It hasn’t always been good. I left education at 16 because my grades were so poor. I didn’t get it diagnosed until I was 30. I spent my life thinking I was thick and as a result had very low self esteem. Getting the right support and embracing it has really helped. I then managed to get on a masters degree programme as a mature student, despite my academic failings, and am much more confident about my writing.

    I even read books now – read my first novel at 24!

    Dyslexics definitely excel in areas that perhaps others don’t and vice versa, but they definitely do have some kind of advanced ability to problem solve – so every team should have one!

  • MONLE SIABOLEE

    Hi Ellen, thanks for sharing your story, I am also dyslexic, and found out when I was 19 at University, it was tough. But you make some very valid points in this article that it makes us driven, and certainly with my copywriting it makes me pay double the amount of attention to proof reading! It’s great to hear how well you’ve done as it affects us all differently. Congratulations on your success as an Entrepreneur and long may it continue!

  • MD JAHIRUL ISLAM

    Hi,
    I am new comer in the PPH,But i have no improved my pph order.please help me how can i improve my order

  • Elina kothari

    Congratulations on your success as an Entrepreneur and long may it continue!

  • Heather Welsh

    Great article.
    Power on all Dyslexic entrepreneurs.

    I own Kaffeintedted Kodemonkey, helping rural communities and local governments build a web presence.
    I am also one of the founders for PETROMatch an oil & gas application helping the industry match equipment with needs.

    My dyslexia has not stopped me it has pushed me to overcome and do better. I frequently get asked how can I code if I can’t spell … “Well, as long as I am consistent it will work…” I say half jokingly. I use Grammarly to check my spelling and grammer on everything. From this post to Google doc for contracts and for copy / past web page content for a dubble check on client websites.

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